MOON: Sea of Tranquility Colony

2017-07-22

WEYLAND MEGACORP ARCHIVES

 

 

 

MOON: “Mare Tranquillitatis” SEA OF TRANQUILITY [1] COLONY

TERRAFORMED: 2031 – 2039 POPULATION: 2,200,000
ESTABLISHED: 2041
INDUSTRY: Light Manufacturing, Cybernetics, Biotech, Security, Education, Mining
NOTES: The moon’s light gravity makes it ideal for specific types of technology manufacturing and biotech development
KEY RESOURCES: Titanium[2], Helium-3[3], Hydrogen[4], Aluminum[5], Silica[6]

Events on Luna

  • 10-Aug-2031 – TERRAFORMING BEGINS ON LUNA WITH PLANS FOR MULTIPLE SETTLEMENTS.
  • 28-May-2039 –  THE FIRST BREATHABLE ATMOSPHERE IS CREATED ON AN EXTRASOLAR PLANET FOLLOWING THE DEPLOYMENT OF A WEYLAND ATMOSPHERE PROCESSOR. *Luna colony becomes the first extra-planetary colony established.
  • 10-Aug-2041 Sea of Tranquility colony established.
  • 1-Jan-2065 – Sieg and Son have established manufacturing facilities in London, Buenos Aires, Nagasaki and the Schickard-Wargentin Frontier (Luna).
  • 14-Jun-2071 – A HANDFUL OF WEYLAND CYBERNETICS REPAIR STATIONS, MOSTLY ON EARTH AND LUNA, HAVE RECEIVED SOME REPORTS, LESS THAN A FEW DOZEN REPORTS, THAT CERTAIN DAVID 7 UNITS… HAVE MALFUNCTIONED WHILE IN SERVICE
  • 7-Jan-2092 – ELLEN LOUISE RIPLEY (ID# 759/L2-01N) IS BORN. IN OLYMPIA, LUNA, UA. LUNA – UNITED STATES.
  • 7-Jan-2094 – RIPLEY IS CONFINED TO A LUNAR QUARANTINE FACILITY FOLLOWING AN OUTBREAK OF XMB VIRUS.
  • 28-Oct-2112 – LAMBERT STARTS WORKING AS SHIPPING LANE TRAFFICATOR FOR FARSIDE LUNAR MINING AT PLYMOUTH/ LUNA-UA
  • 5-Feb-2114 – LAMBERT FINISHES HER ASSIGNMENT WITH FAR SIDE LUNAR MINING.

 


Titanium

This lunar mosaic shows the boundary between Mare Serenitatis and Mare Tranquillitatis. The relative blue colour of the Tranquillitatis mare is due to higher abundances of the titanium-bearing mineral ilmenite.
Credit: NASA/GSFC/Arizona State University[2]

Helium – 3

The Apollo programme’s own geologist, Harrison Schmidt, has repeatedly made the argument for Helium-3 mining, whilst Gerald Kulcinski at the University of Wisconsin-Madison is another leading proponent. He has created a small reactor at the Fusion Technology Institute, but so far it has not been possible to create the helium fusion reaction with a net power output.

This has not stopped the search for Helium-3 from being a motivating factor in space exploration, however. Apart from the traditional space-faring nations, the India has previously indicated its interest in mining the lunar surface. The use of Moon resources was also part of Newt Gingrich’s unsuccessful candidacy for the Republican party’s nomination for the US presidency in 2012.

Private enterprise is also interested in using fuel from the Moon – although possibly by extracting water rather than Helium-3. The Shackleton Energy company envisages providing propellant for missions throughout the Solar System using lunar water.

The Moon could be used as a base for further exploration

Some teams vying for the Google Lunar X-Prize also see mining as an ultimate goal of their landers. ESA has also considered using the Moon to help missions farther into the Solar System.[3]

 

Hydrogen

molecules3D
Image c/o PROF. VIRGÍLIO GUEDES PROF.ª GISELLE PALMEIRA

Resources will be used in space, starting with water which can be split by solar power into oxygen and hydrogen fuel for spaceships.[4]

Aluminium

s-l500
Natural Weathered Aluminum Nugget

Stony asteroids and meteorites typically contain 36% oxygen, 26% iron, 18% silicon, 14% magnesium as well as smaller amounts of aluminum, nickel and calcium. With the proper refining technology a stony meteorite could produce plenty of other building materials (silicon and aluminum are used on Earth in construction projects of all kinds). Earths crust has oxygen, silicon aluminum iron and other minerals, so the processing of an asteroid wouldn’t require totally new technology, just a few refinements to account for gravity and other conditions particular to space mining.[5]

Silicon

SiliconCroda
By Enricoros at English Wikipedia – Transferred from en.wikipedia to Commons., Public Domain,

Elements such as gold and platinum can be found on some asteroids. But water, silicon, nickel, and iron are the elements expected to become central to a space “economy” should it ever develop.

Water can be “mined” for its hydrogen (a fuel) and oxygen (needed for humans in space), while silicon can be used for solar power systems, and the ubiquitous nickel and iron for potential space manufacturing. (See an interactive on asteroid mining.)[6]

 

Mare Tranquillitatis

Meaning Sea of Tranquility in Latin, for a large, dark, basaltic plain, formed by ancient volcanic eruptions. They were dubbed maria, Latin for “seas”, by early astronomers who mistook them for actual seas.[1]

60_earthsmoon_carousel_4
Spectacular high Sun view of the Mare Tranquillitatis pit crater revealing boulders on an otherwise smooth floor. Image Credit: NASA/GSFC/Arizona State University

The mare material within the basin consists of basalt formed in the intermediate to a young age group of the Upper Imbrian… material closer to the surface; or the top melting as heat flowed upwards through the mantle because of reduced overlying thermal insulation.[7]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


References

  1. “Moon Mare/Maria”Gazetteer of Planetary Nomenclature. USGS Astrogeology. Retrieved 2010-08-20.
  2. Moon Packed with Precious Titanium, NASA Probe Finds, By SPACE.com Staff | October 11, 2011 07:00am ET https://www.space.com/13247-moon-map-lunar-titanium.html
  3.  Helium-3 Mining on Lunar surface by eesa, https://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Preparing_for_the_Future/Space_for_Earth/Energy/Helium-3_mining_on_the_lunar_surface
  4. Space mining takes giant leap from sci-fi to reality, Clive Cookson OCTOBER 19, 2017 https://www.ft.com/content/78e8cc84-7076-11e7-93ff-99f383b09ff9
  5. The Possibilities of Mining Asteroids and the Moon for Resources, written by: S.L. Bradish • edited by: RC Davison • updated: 9/11/2009 https://www.brighthub.com/science/space/articles/4320.aspx
  6. The Promise and Perils of Mining Asteroids, BY PUBLISHED 

  7. “Mare Tranquillitatis,” Gazetteer of Planetary Nomenclature.

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